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Pairing Cheeses From Here With Ciders

Pairing Cheeses From Here With Ciders - Visual

A new cheese tasting trend has been emerging for some time, with the traditional “wine and cheese” tastings giving way to a new, subtle combination of cheese and cider.

A new cheese tasting trend has been emerging for some time, with the traditional “wine and cheese” tastings giving way to a new, subtle combination of cheese and cider.

Discover or rediscover the flavour harmonies of these delicious products from Quebec: our cheeses from here and Quebec ciders. Just as with wine and cheese tastings, each cider can be paired with a particular cheese.

Here are some suggestions of winning combinations:

Still cider

Non-sparkling cider made with apples picked at full maturity. Its attributes, alcohol content, sweetness and acidity vary according to the type of apples and the maker’s know-how. Depending on alcohol content, these ciders can be paired with stronger or milder cheeses. There are two types of this cider:

Light cider

Obtained through the fermentation of apple juice.

Alcohol content: 1.5% to 7%.

When alcohol content is under 5%, mild cheeses are the best choice. Cheeses with a more pronounced flavour are a good complement for ciders with an alcohol content of 5% or more.

Mild cheeses
Cheeses with a more pronounced flavour

Strong cider

Obtained through the fermentation of apple juice, to which apple juice concentrate may be added.

Alcohol content: 7% to 13%.

Strongly flavoured cheeses

Sparkling cider

It is carbonated through a foam taking process using one of the following methods:

  • natural bottle fermentation (traditional method);
  • closed vats (Charmat process);
  • forced carbonation (carbon dioxide injection).

Ice cider

This unique product from Quebec is made possible by our climate. It is obtained through natural freezing in winter, which gives the apples a higher sugar concentration. The fermentation of this concentrated juice yields an exceptional cider.

Apple mistelle

Apple juice fortified with alcohol or apple brandy to prevent its fermentation. A light apple-flavoured liquor, it is especially appreciated by amateurs of Pineau des Charentes.

Courses

  • 1st course

    Light still ciders are recommended for the first course.

  • 2nd course

    Sparkling ciders are served mostly for the second course.

  • 3rd course

    Strong ciders and apple mistelles are served for the third course.

We recommend that you end your “cider and cheese” tasting with an ice cider. Its mildly acidic yet sweet flavour goes well with many cheeses, but comes out especially well with stronger, aged cheeses. Blue veined cheeses, aged cheddars from here and certain firm or semi-soft aged cheeses complement ice ciders really well.

For a simple, happy-hour style tasting, we recommend serving a minimum of two ciders. For instance, you could serve a light cider and an ice cider, or a still cider followed by an apple mistelle.

Accompaniments

Here are some suggestions of foods that you could serve to accompany the ciders and cheeses you will be tasting:

  • Different types of melba toast, crackers and breads for each course;

  • A variety of fresh fruit such as grapes, apple pieces and strawberries;

  • Mixed dried fruit and nuts, such as cranberries, figs, apricots, almonds, walnuts, pistachios, etc.;

  • Terrines, pâtés and different types of home-made cretons;

About Quebec ciders

Ciders were first made in Quebec when the first apple trees were planted in New France in the early 17th century. For the past few years, there has been a major revival of ciders in Quebec, with products that set themselves apart through their quality and originality. There are over 60 cider mills throughout Quebec producing over 300 ciders. Discover the wide variety of Quebec ciders by visiting a cider mill near you. You can also ask for tips on how to pair ciders with our cheeses from here.

Quebec Ciders

Pour plus d’information, visitez

www.cidreduquebec.com